5 must-visit towns and villages in Mexico

Posted: May 21, 2019

Author: Sam Murray

When you think of visiting Mexico, it’s probably the stretching beaches and major cities that come to mind. But if you’re looking for something a bit more off-the-beaten-path, why not try one of the pretty and fascinating small towns and villages in Mexico? You’ll find a treasure trove of rich culture, beautiful architecture, and deep history, but without the crowds you might find in some of the tourist hotspots. To give you some ideas on where to go, here are five towns and villages in Mexico that are well worth a visit.

Speak to a Journey Mexico advisor who can help you to organize a trip to any one of these five beautiful getaways plus many others in Mexico.

5 Beautiful Towns And Villages In Mexico

Sayulita, Nayarit

Sayulita is a dreamy surf town on Nayarit’s coast where young travelers head for a taste of Mexico’s beach life. Around an hour’s drive from Puerto Vallarta, Sayulita (along with its nearby sister town San Pancho) has become a go-to destination for boho-chic adventurers looking to meet like-minded people. Its relatively peaceful waves make it a great spot for a beginner surfer, while more experienced riders can test their mettle in the crashing waves of San Pancho. After the sun sets and the wave riders have dispersed, Sayulita offers a buzzing nightlife of small bars and restaurants. Pick up a tequila, mezcal, or margarita and do a bit of people watching.

San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas

A cute valley town surrounded by forest, San Cristobal boasts cobblestone streets, colorful neighborhoods, and quaint Mexican town life. It’s a place for wandering. Visitors love to stroll along the streets taking in the beautiful colonial architecture and dipping into small shops. The central plaza is the perfect place to rest your feet and watch the world go by. Those interested in history and architecture will love the cathedral, which was built in 1528. Its wonderful interior includes gold-leaf wood altarpieces and paintings by Juan Correa.

Tequila, Jalisco

The home of Mexico’s most famous drink, Tequila is a beautiful town surround by an undulating landscape of blue agave fields. It has grown in popularity, in no small part, thanks to the drink with which it shares its name. Tourists arrive from across the world to experience tequila at source, taking tours of distilleries, and learning about the production process from master tequileros. Just under one hour’s drive from Guadalajara, it’s possible to visit Tequila on a day tour or stay for the weekend.

Read more: The Weekend Tequila Experience

Izamal, Yucatan

The historic town of Izamal lies just under an hour away from Merida in the Yucatan Peninsula. It has become famous for its bright yellow-and-white buildings which give the town its identity. Perhaps most recognizable of all is the Monastery of Izamal, a grand place of worship with a large central quad which is framed by a rectangle arched walkway. Aside from the photogenic architecture, Izamal is also steeped in history having been occupied since pre-Hispanic times. Its Maya ruins and pyramids have also become a must-visit for those interested in Mexico’s past.   

Zinacantan, Chiapas

The people of Zinacantan in Chiapas are known throughout Mexico for their preservation of traditional Maya weaving techniques. Tourists can visit indigenous artisans and watch as they work looms to make their striking and colorful pieces. The area itself is beautiful, sitting in the highlands of Chiapas, and surrounded by pine forest. A trip to Zinacantan can be combined with a visit to the nearby San Juan Chamula which boasts a beautiful yet simple white-fronted church, indigenous cemetery, and a fascinating town center.

Visiting these beautiful villages and towns in Mexico is simple. Just speak to a Journey Mexico advisor or fill in our easy-to-use Trip Planner. One of our experienced Mexico experts can help to organize your dream trip.

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